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"PEOPLE TRIBUNAL" UNDER HANOI REGIME
(Vietnamese Communism)

The following pictures are real documentary photos taken by a Soviet photographer Dmitri Baltermants (1912-1990) in 1955 in North Vietnam. The photos show a typical "People Tribunal" under Vietnamese Communist regime (the same recent Hanoi regime) in which the victims (land owners) have been trialed for "crime" of property possession. Usually the "People Tribunal" is ended with a death penalty verdict. Victim will be shot on the spot.


THE PICTURES ARE WORTH THOUSAND WORDS
(Chinese Communism)

You don't have a bit idea about Asian Communists (Chinese and Vietnamese Communists particularly)?

You have been wondering for so long why we had to fight against Communism in Vietnam?

These photos will shed light and "liberate" your thought! The photos are real, posted in sequence. If you have a faint heart, don't click to open some of them. These photos have been adjusted for proper light, contrast and quality.


Crime Against Humanity

Need for international condemnation of crimes of totalitarian communist regimes, the COUNCIL OF EUROPE Parliamentary Assembly has issued a Provisional edition "Resolution 148"


RESOLUTION 1481 (2006)1

1. The Parliamentary Assembly refers to its Resolution 1096 (1996) on measures to dismantle the heritage of the former communist totalitarian systems.

2. The totalitarian communist regimes which ruled in Central and Eastern Europe in the last century, and which are still in power in several countries in the world, have been, without exception, characterised by massive violations of human rights. The violations have differed depending on the culture, country and the historical period and have included individual and collective assassinations and executions, death in concentration camps, starvation, deportations, torture, slave labour and other forms of mass physical terror, persecution on ethnic or religious base, violation of freedom of conscience, thought and expression, of freedom of press, and also lack of political pluralism.

3. The crimes were justified in the name of the class struggle theory and the principle of dictatorship of the proletariat. The interpretation of both principles legitimised the "elimination" of people who were considered harmful to the construction of a new society and, as such, enemies of the totalitarian communist regimes. A vast number of victims in every country concerned were its own nationals. It was the case particularly of peoples of the former USSR who by far outnumbered other peoples in terms of the number of victims.

4. The Assembly recognises that, in spite of the crimes of totalitarian communist regimes, some European communist parties have made contributions to achieving democracy.

5. The fall of totalitarian communist regimes in Central and Eastern Europe has not been followed in all cases by an international investigation of the crimes committed by them. Moreover, the authors of these crimes have not been brought to trial by the international community, as was the case with the horrible crimes committed by National Socialism (nazism).

6. Consequently, public awareness of crimes committed by totalitarian communist regimes is very poor. Communist parties are legal and active in some countries, even if in some cases they have not distanced themselves from the crimes committed by totalitarian communist regimes in the past.

7. The Assembly is convinced that the awareness of history is one of the preconditions for avoiding similar crimes in the future. Furthermore, moral assessment and condemnation of crimes committed play an important role in the education of young generations. The clear position of the international community on the past may be a reference for their future actions.

8. Moreover, the Assembly believes that those victims of crimes committed by totalitarian communist regimes who are still alive or their families, deserve sympathy, understanding and recognition for their sufferings.

9. Totalitarian communist regimes are still active in some countries of the world and crimes continue to be committed. National interest perceptions should not prevent countries from adequate criticism of present totalitarian communist regimes. The Assembly strongly condemns all those violations of human rights.

10. The debates and condemnations which have taken place so far at national level in some Council of Europe member states cannot give dispensation to the international community from taking a clear position on the crimes committed by the totalitarian communist regimes. It has a moral obligation to do so without any further delay.

11. The Council of Europe is well placed for such a debate at international level. All former European communist countries, with the exception of Belarus, are now its members and the protection of human rights and the rule of law are basic values for which it stands.

12. Therefore, the Parliamentary Assembly strongly condemns the massive human rights violations committed by the totalitarian communist regimes and expresses sympathy, understanding and recognition to the victims of these crimes.

13. Furthermore, it calls on all communist or post-communist parties in its member states which have not so far done so to reassess the history of communism and their own past, clearly distance themselves from the crimes committed by totalitarian communist regimes and condemn them without any ambiguity.

14. The Assembly believes that this clear position of the international community will pave the way to further reconciliation. Furthermore, it will hopefully encourage historians throughout the world to continue their research aimed at the determination and objective verification of what took place.

(1) Assembly debate on 25 January 2006 (5th Sitting) (see Doc.10765, report of the Political Affairs Committee, rapporteur: Mr Lindblad). Text adopted by the Assembly on 25 January 2006 (5th Sitting).

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